Myths about Montessori

Dec
14
2009

Myth #13: Montessori discourages cooperation and creativity.

During these very early years the child’s brain absorbs everything around them, without filters or censors. The scientifically designed Sensorial materials fine-tune the senses to orderly receive information bombarding the child. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #12: Montessori schools apply undue pressure in learning academics.

Due to the dynamic quality of the brain, young children can absorb vast amounts of knowledge including one’s mother tongue. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #11: Montessori is not for all children.

Montessori’s philosophy of child development is timeless and inclusive of all children, regardless of where or how they live. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #10: Montessori classrooms have homogenous populations and don’t embrace cultural diversity (lack diversity in backgrounds and socio-economics).

Some are private some are public but all Montessori schools reflect the population of the community it exists in. Geography folders depict the people, places, monuments…the culture of within each region. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #9: Montessori children are not socialized and don’t play because children “work” and lessons are given individually.

Self-disciplined Lessons of Grace& Courtesy develop a sense of community and respect 3-year age groupings decreases transitions &fosters. Part of Dr. Montessori’s legacy has been promoting peace and citizenship. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #8: I never hear about famous people who attended Montessori.

Here are a couple of Montessori graduates you might have heard of. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #7: Without testing and grades there is no measurement for the child’s knowledge acquired.

Individual lessons. Observation Peer-learning among the mixed ages reinforces previously acquired knowledge.  Children freely repeat activities working towards mastery at their own pace. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #6: All Montessori schools are the same.

Lacking a trademark or patent, Montessori’s name can be misused and misleading. Some organizations, such as the Association Montessori International (AMI), have safe-guarded her lectures and work by certifying its teachers and schools with rigorous training and consultations. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #5: Montessori doesn’t prepare children for the “real world”; transitions to traditional schools are difficult.

Individual choices reveal the child’s unique potentialities Practical Life. Many notable education theorists and prominent child psychologists studied under Dr. Montessori: Anna Freud, Jean Piaget, Alfred Adler, and Erik Erikson. [more]

Dec
14
2009

Myth #4: Montessori lets the kids ‘decide’ their own lessons, which they can’t do — because they’re kids! I want my kids taught by a real teacher.

Nope. Observation by the teacher connects the child to developmentally appropriate activities; thus the adult is known as the “guide” who helps the child learn how to learn. [more]