Dec
14
2009

Myth #6: All Montessori schools are the same.

Lacking a trademark or patent, Montessori’s name can be misused and misleading. Some organizations, such as the Association Montessori International (AMI), have safe-guarded her lectures and work by certifying its teachers and schools with rigorous training and consultations.

This prestigious AMI status is one way for parents to know that a teacher or a school has the full understanding of the Montessori principles. The materials are timeless: around the world and across a century, the materials have withstood the test of time. Affiliations.

Dec
14
2009

Myth #5: Montessori doesn’t prepare children for the “real world”; transitions to traditional schools are difficult.

Individual choices reveal the child’s unique potentialities Practical Life. Many notable education theorists and prominent child psychologists studied under Dr. Montessori: Anna Freud, Jean Piaget, Alfred Adler, and Erik Erikson.

Dec
14
2009

Myth #4: Montessori lets the kids ‘decide’ their own lessons, which they can’t do — because they’re kids! I want my kids taught by a real teacher.

Nope. Observation by the teacher connects the child to developmentally appropriate activities; thus the adult is known as the “guide” who helps the child learn how to learn.

Older children role model for the younger children, often teaching each other Freedom within limits Freedom to move. Following the child’s developmental needs, the Montessori classroom is specifically designed to enhance rather than oppose needs such as order.

The materials are self-correcting: through usage the child discovers if they are using the materials correctly Auto-didactic. Rather than chaos, each child is engaged in individual activity. Rather than behavior issues due to inattention, each child is moving at their own pace on an individual learning plan.

Dec
13
2009

Myth #3: Montessori education is expensive

Dec
13
2009

Myth #2: Montessori is one of those experimental and anything-goes teaching methods from the 70′s — where there are no rules in the class. The kids don’t get discipline or structure. The permissiveness turns the kids into spoiled brats. It’s too easy-breezy for me!

Dec
13
2009

Myth #1: Montessori is unstructured; children wander around doing whatever they want without guidance or direction.

Dec
13
2009

Focus learners by eliminating distractions

As it turns out, there is a lot to be distracted with.   Try this….

Dec
12
2009

Functionally illiterate: up to 20 percent of American adults may recognize letters and words, but can’t read a bus sign.

You may have heard the NPR Morning Edition broadcast today: Years Of Schooling Leaves Some Students Illiterate.  Listening to the segment, it reminded me about how XXXXX.

The segment featured Beth Furtig who reports on education issues for WNYC. Mother Jones did a book review on Furtig’s new book called “Why Cant U Teach Me 2 Read?”.